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  • TFTI PG Symposium 2020

Presentation title:

With(out) Audience: Experiencing Recorded Ballet In and Out of Lockdown


Bio:

My name is Linda Kvitkina, I have an MA in History and have recently become interested in researching dancing. I am fascinated by the field and I am a devoted member of dance community, aside from being a researcher. I focus my studies on ballet and contemporary dance.











Abstract:

Akram Khan's Giselle invites the viewer into the world of a refugee camp, separated by a wall from the richer characters. Giselle is no longer a naive peasant girl, but a woman. She is pursued by two men and declines the interest of the one that she does not desire, while encouraging the other, even though, as it turns out, he belongs to a different world.


We (myself and the audience) are going to explore how the perception of the same piece differs by the external context through auto-anthropology. The ballet was recorded for the Theatre HD project, and was shown both in cinema, and online. We will explore the difference of perception of it in the cinema and at home during lockdown, when the entire world turned to be behind the wall, and the usual routine, much the same as for Giselle was left behind, with movements and music stifled and melted into new reality of the Willis' void world.


We will discuss the setting, costumes, and dance techniques, but will ultimately focus on the experience of viewing the recorded ballet and explore whether it preserved the conventional point of viewing it, which is from the theatre hall onto the stage.

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  • TFTI PG Symposium 2020

Presentation title:

Presenting: inclusive educational practices in the male dominated music technology classroom



Bio:

Jamie Donnelly is a MA by Research student in Interactive Media at the University of York, as well as the course co-ordinator for the Access to HE Music diploma and lecturer of Higher Education Sound and Music Technology, Audiovisual Technology and Digital Video Production at Middlesbrough College. Jamie's passion for gender equality and inclusive practices in academia are informed by his own experiences as a lecturer, as well as the Audio Engineering Society (AES) UK panel at the University of York in February 2018 which discussed imbalances in depth. When not teaching Jamie can be found in the recording studio producing local, national and international artists or on tour. Jamie is a committed vegetarian, ardent vinyl records collector, convicted cat lover and bodybuilding enthusiast.


Abstract:

This presentation is based upon my MA by Research dissertation which addresses a gap in research on gender equality and inclusive practices within the sound and music technology classroom. Preceding research has investigated how women have been excluded in academia and the workplace, as well as sex aggregated data on sound and music technology programmes throughout the academic levels, and postulations on why women are dissuaded from academic progression and careers in sound and music technology. The research draws on the aforementioned previous studies and contributes new ideas to the field.


This body of work includes analysis of 96 female and non-binary respondents’ experiences of the sound and music technology classroom in terms of equality and inclusivity. The results of the survey have had profound implications on my own practices, informing a number of changes to curriculum and teaching environment design. These changes have resulted in a more diverse range of projects submitted by students, an increase in diversity of authors in student reference lists, and a more conscious, harmonious and respectful classroom. The results of the survey have been framed alongside existing literature and anecdotal evidence of implementing a number of changes as a consequence of the data.


The outcome is a set of recommendations and guidelines for improving gender equality and inclusive practices within the sound and music technology classroom.

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  • TFTI PG Symposium 2020

Presentation title:

Audio Describing gestures and facial expressions in Thai serials


Bio:

I'm a Thai lecturer from Thammasat university. I have been worked about the Audio Description for television programmes in Thailand from 2014 to present. My scope of AD working relates to the AD script writing, AD consulation, AD training, and research on AD users. As a researher, most of my studies are qualitative research which relate to focus group, in-depth interview or non-participant observation. As a PhD student of university of York, I run a project about 'Audio Describing gestures and facial expressions in Thai serials'.



Abstract:

Audio Description for television in Thailand is growing at a slow pace because there are many challenges to drive the policy of television access services (Audio Description: AD, Closed Captioning: CC, Sign Language: SL); a salient problem is that of limited knowledge. The media regulator (The National Broadcasting Telecommunication Commissions: NBTC) has had to postpone the roll out of accessibility services several times because many television broadcasters, especially commercial broadcasters, are still encountering obstacles linked to the cost of accessibility as well as limited knowledge of the area. The results of this research will contribute to the training of Thai audio describers and, as a result, contribute to extending access to television programmes to people with sight loss.


Qualitative research will be undertaken in order to answer the following research questions: (1) How can we classify different types of gestures and facial expressions in Thai serials with regards to their function in discourse, so as to apply such classification to Audio Description? (2) When focusing on serial programmes, what are the differences in accessible culture of gestures and facial expressions between sighted audience and unsighted audience? (3) What are the effective ways of transferring gestures and facial expressions to verbal modes in Audio Description for Thais with visual impairments?

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