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  • TFTI PG Symposium 2020

Presentation title:

The Educational Potential of Interactive Storytelling - Experience an Anti-Bullying Interactive Film!



Bio:

Rebecca Gallon is a French and English student currently doing a MRes in Interactive Media funded by XR Stories. She has a passion for stories that share a positive message to the world. She previously studied Film and Television at the University of York. Her third year dissertation project was an interactive film and she was truly intrigued by the unexplored possibilities that interactivity offers for storytellers. That's why she decided to spend more time focusing on that topic and created an interactive film against cyber bullying called Butterfly!





Abstract:

I am currently researching the educational potential of interactive storytelling. Interactive storytelling has the unique ability to put the viewers in the shoes of the characters. Their decisions will impact the outcome and hence cause them to think more about the consequences of what they chose and maybe make them change their actions in the real world. To prove this idea, I have created a short interactive film about cyber-bullying. The viewers will have the possibility to feel as if they are a student of Lisa's school through an app that reproduces social media.

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  • TFTI PG Symposium 2020

Presentation title:

The Fall of Lucifer: shared sensations within the domestic space of online theatre



Bio:

I am a PhD researcher and community theatre director, currently exploring how community theatre groups use sites in their performances of the York Mystery Plays. I specialise in site-based theatre, with credits including York Mystery Plays 2018, Shakespeare in pubs (Henry IV: A Pub Wake) and gardens (Richard II), Dracula in an abandoned house, a Dickens travelogue in parks (The Lazy Tour), and Ben Jonson’s The Alchemist in a gin shop attic. I work closely with York International Shakespeare Festival and York Shakespeare Project on community productions.




Abstract:

With our physical horizons dramatically reduced, online theatre allows communities to gather together and perform once more. However, online read-throughs have focused on the aural/oral, with visual elements often an afterthought. In doing so, online theatre positions the screen as the site of performance, rather than as a nexus of physical presences. Meanwhile, sensations shared by actors and audience- touch, smell, taste- become impossible to share, undermining the “concentrated co-presence” that characterises theatre performances (Sullivan 2018).


I address these issues by bringing site-specific methodology- a focus on the specificities of a space- to bear on a domestic site. As Klein et al. (2019, 10) suggest, ownership of a space is formed not only by money or legal documents, but by “the rituals (daily and extraordinary) that we enact within it”. In rehearsing this ritual play of community/identity-forming, it becomes a way of forming domestic sites as a creative space. By staging the York Mystery Plays’ Creation of the Angels/Fall of Lucifer, I explore how physical touchstones found in a domestic space- a matchstick, a chair, a handful of earth- can ground a virtual, global performance in the physical and local.


In advance, I ask viewers to find within their local environment the following items:

A box of matches.

Earth/soil/dust A throne.

A blank page.

The dominant scent.

A familiar taste.


These might be the actual object, a substitute (a cigarette or a bike light for a matchbox) or a metaphorical replacement (earth/soil replaced by a local map). Be creative!


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  • TFTI PG Symposium 2020

Presentation title:

Life under lockdown: how have graffitists, street artists and communities artistically responded to life during the coronavirus pandemic?


Bio:

Emma Bryning is a PhD student in the Department of Archaeology at the University of York. Her research focuses on the contemporary significance of graffiti at historic sites, in collaboration between the University of York and English Heritage. She is also a Heritage & Community Impact Manager at the Monastery Manchester and has previously worked in museums and heritage sites predominantly across the North West of England.







Abstract:

The desire to physically leave one’s mark on the world around us has been around for thousands of years: from pre-historic cave drawings to contemporary street artists. The universality of mark-making means that such practices can be found across the globe and across historic periods, yet, the marks themselves are inherently reflective of a particular moment in space and time. Mark-makers have a unique opportunity to respond to life around them using physical and artistic gestures to tell their story.


Our understanding of the distinction between public and private spaces has intensified due to the coronavirus pandemic, with many countries on lockdown and citizens told to stay at home. In spite of this, across the globe, graffiti and street artists continue to take to the streets expressing themselves publicly. They share messages of solidarity, their gratitude to medical workers, spread awareness and express their anger and frustration - telling very public stories of life during a pandemic. Non-artists have responded too, with chalk markings and pictures seen in windows and on pavements across the globe. The increasing prevalence of the internet has meant that such marks and stories are both local and global in their reach.

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